January Garden Tasks

     Frost is likely on dry, windless, clear nights this month

 

Apply mulch around plants and under drain spouts to retain water, prevent soil erosion, and feed nutrients into soil with each rain.

~ Keep plants watered to prevent frost damage

~ Wrap irrigation valves and pipes to protect from freezing

~ Turn off irrigation timers if it rains

~ Apply mulch around plants to retain water and soil, and to feed nutrients into soil with each rain

~ Prune roses and summer-blooming deciduous fruit trees

~ Don’t prune frost-damaged plants until spring growth

~ Plant bare-root trees and shrubs now through early March

~ Mulch under downspouts with bark, compost, or gravel to help rain soak into soil instead of running off

~ Check tree stakes & ties for support against strong winds

 

 

Check out our featured “Plant of The Month” for January

Copper Canyon Daisy,
Mexican Marigold

Tagetes lemmonii

Copper Canyon Daisy is an aromatic, long-blooming relative of marigolds whose long-lasting flowers shine throughout winter months and attract butterflies.

  • Plant Form: Herbaceous evergreen perennial
  • Water Use: Low
  • Mature Size: 3-5 ft. tall x 4-6 ft. wide
  • Exposure: Full Sun or part shade
  • Bloom Time: Year-round; Heaviest bloom
    Fall – Winter (Sept – Jan)
  • Native to: Southern Arizona, northern Mexico
  • Hardiness: Cold hardy to 5°F (roots); 20°F (foliage)

 

 

Copper Canyon Daisy is highly aromatic, releasing a strong fragrance when its foliage is rubbed or brushed against, which is likely the reason that rabbits and deer leave this plant alone. Yellow-orange, daisy-like flowers develop in fall, and provide intense color through late fall, winter, and into early spring, if not damaged by frost. Lacy, dark green foliage is tipped with fragrant oil glands, which release a scent reminiscent of typical marigolds. Cut plant back hard in late winter or spring after blooming subsides to remove any frost-damaged foliage, to promote dense growth, and to keep it a nice shape. This drought-tolerant plant appreciates a little irrigation, but too much water or too little light can produce leggy plants with sparse flowers. Plant Copper Canyon Daisy back from high traffic areas, due to its brittle stems. While not long-lived, this fast-growing plant works well in the background to set off shorter plants in front.

 

 December Garden Tasks

     Winter begins and plant growth is on hold until February

Prune to shape evergreens, and save some of the trimmings for holiday decorations, such as from this Hollyleaf Cherry.

Prune to shape evergreens, and save some of the trimmings for holiday decorations, such as from this Hollyleaf Cherry (yes, my ocean-bred husband does wear shorts all year, even in winter unless it is literally freezing).

 

~Prune to shape evergreens like arborvitae, juniper, pines, and cypress—and save trimmings for holiday decorations

~Prune dense trees to avoid wind damage; make sure young trees are well-staked

~For overnight protection when frost threatens, cover delicate plants with large cardboard boxes, old sheets or tarps

~Consider setting irrigation timers to “off”, and manually water in response to our irregular winter weather, based on winds, rain, or snow; using the manual mode on your controller in winter can save precious water

 

 

Check out our featured “Plant of The Month” for December

 

 November Garden Tasks

     Last chance for fall planting season while roots are still active

 

This is your last chance for the fall planting season while roots are still active in warm soils

This is your last chance for the fall planting season while roots are still active in warm soils

~You may continue planting this month even with cooler temperatures, but plants will establish roots more slowly than earlier in fall

~Finish planting California natives

~Plant seeds for spring & summer blooms; choose mix of western wild flowers with annuals & perennials for long-lasting color

~Irrigate frequently during Santa Ana winds, which pull moisture from both plants and soil

~Give one last deep watering to deciduous trees and grapevines but discontinue feeding to harden them off for cold weather

~Irrigate fall-planted trees and bushes deeply once or twice this month to ensure good root formation prior to dormancy

 

Check out our featured “Plant of The Month” for November

 

October Garden Tasks

Fall is the perfect time to plant new native and drought-tolerant plants, when soils are still warm but air temperatures have cooled down. Your established plants will need less water as nights get cooler and longer, so remember to adjust your irrigation timers to water less often.

 

     Take advantage of fall planting season to develop strong, summer-ready plants

 

~ Continue to plant native and drought-tolerant perennial plants and trees. Fall plantings develop deep roots while soils are still warm but the air is cool, which stimulates root growth. This early root establishment reduces water needs during your new plant’s two- to three-year establishment.

~ Adjust irrigation timers as nights get longer and cooler. Simply making monthly changes to your irrigation schedule can save more water and money than any other thing you can do

~ Fall opportunity to transplant Joshua trees and yuccas from late September to October.

~ Reduce water to cactus and succulents to prepare them for winter rest and protect against frost damage.

~ Fall annuals abound in nurseries, but are mostly high water-use; consider using them only near entries, on patios, and in containers. Plant perennials and bulbs for less maintenance and lower water use.

 

Check out our featured “Plant of The Month” for October

 

You can find CALIFORNIA NATIVE PLANTS at these southland nurseries:

 

High Desert

Bush Monkeyflower - long-blooming, evergreen native shrub waiting for your yard!

Bush Monkeyflower – long-blooming, evergreen native shrub waiting for your yard!

 

Cactus Mart

49889 29 Palms Hwy

Morongo Valley, CA 92256

(760) 363-6076

www.cactusmart.net

 

Unique Garden Center

56637 29 Palms Hwy

Yucca Valley, CA 92284

(760) 365-1511

 

Oak Hills Nursery 

Hollyleaf Cherry - native evergreen shrub or small tree makes a great privacy screen.

Hollyleaf Cherry – native evergreen shrub or small tree that makes a great privacy screen.

13874 Ranchero Rd.

Oak Hills, CA 92344

(760) 947-6261

 www.oakhillsnursery.net

 

Low Desert

 

Bob Williams Nursery

48-575 Madison

Indio, CA 92201

(760) 347-6397

www.bobwilliamsnursery.com

 

Moller’s Garden Center

For stunning fall color & hummingbird magnet, plant California Fuchsia in masses.

For stunning fall color and a guaranteed hummingbird magnet, plant California Fuchsia in masses.

72-235 Painters Path

Palm Desert, CA 92260

(760) 346-0545

www.mollersgardencenter.com

 

Moorten Botanical Garden

1701 S. Palm Canyon Dr.

Palm Springs, CA 92264

(760) 327-6555

 

Southland and Beyond

 

Lily Rock Native Gardens

54385 North Circle Drive

Idyllwild, CA 92549

One of our most drought-tolerant native plants, California Buckwheat fills in your yard like baby's breath fills in a bouquet.

One of our most drought-tolerant native plants, California Buckwheat fills in your yard like baby’s breath fills in a bouquet.

(951) 468-3125

www.facebook.com/LilyRockNativeGardens

 

Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Gardens

1500 North College Ave.

Claremont, CA 91711-3157

(909) 625-8676

see website for plant sale dates

www.rsabg.org

 

Native Sons Inc.

379 W. El Campo Rd.

Arroyo Grande, CA 93420

1-805-481-5996

Bountiful flowers from late afternoon through early morning attract hummingbirds, butterflies and moths to Bigelow's Four O'Clock, a tidy, rounded, native evergreen shrub.

Bountiful flowers from late afternoon through early morning attract hummingbirds, butterflies and moths to Bigelow’s Four O’Clock, a tidy, rounded, native evergreen shrub.

www.nativeson.com

 

Tree of Life Nursery

33201 Ortega Hwy

P.O. Box 635

San Juan Capistrano, CA 92693

(949) 728-0685

www.treeoflifenursery.com

 

High Country Gardens

2902 Rufina St.

Santa Fe, NM 87505

1-800-925-9387

www.highcountrygardens.com

 

Mockingbird Nursery

Desert Sage's late winter and spring whorls of blue flowers attract hummingbirds.

Desert Sage’s late winter and spring whorls of blue flowers attract hummingbirds.

1670 Jackson St.

Riverside, CA 92504

(909) 780-3571

www.mockingbirdnursery.com

 

Theodore Payne Foundation

10459 Tuxford St.

Sun Valley, CA 91352-2126

(818) 768-1802

www.theodorepayne.org

 

Misty Meadows Landscape Nursery

43601 Mesa St

Banning Ca 92220

951-765-7542

 

Why Plant Native?

Inviting Native Plants into Your Yard

Tips on Planting Native Plants

Tips on Watering Native Plants

Native Plants for High-Desert Gardens